Alzheimer’s in ActionAn online community connecting people and families affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia.
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"What if I see you, and I don't know that
  you're my daughter, and I don't know that
  you love me?"

"Then, I'll tell you that I do, and you'll
  believe me.”

    - Lisa Genova, Still Alice -
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Tips for dementia caregivers

Very few people outside of the healthcare industry would have answered “caregiver,” when asked their dream career. It isn’t an option on the recommended career list or a career openly spoken about. Yet most caregivers serve out of love and …

The model ambassador : Chad Meihuizen

The glamour of the lifestyle of living it up in cities around the world changed somewhat when Chad Meihuizen’s dad contracted Alzheimer’s disease. He tells Joy Watson about this life-changing experience. When Chad Meihuizen was a boy, he wanted to …

Medical aids not helping dementia patients

I have a parent who suffers from dementia,and the medical aide Medscheme ,after all her and my late father years of contributions have failed to honour her medication claims of about R800. A MONTH MAXIMUM. I am thoroughly disgusted with …

Alzheimer’s disease – our story

Thank you for all the trouble you are taking to encourage medical aids (ours is Discovery) to recognise Alzheimer’s disease.  It is so good to know that someone is trying to understand the financial burden that this disease imposes on …

My cruel experience when my husband was admitted to hospital

I recently had the experience of having my husband, an Alzheimer sufferer, admitted to hospital.

I have no quarrel with the care he was given. In fact I was grateful for the care & attention shown by both the nurses & doctors. However, I was very disturbed by his reaction to the new environment – strange surroundings & complete strangers.

Custard on her chicken

My darling mum was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in December 2009. With sadness we watched this vibrant grandmother decline into a person who no longer knew who she was or recognised her family.